Indexical Design Symposium

Conversation, Lecture, Panel Discussion, Presentation, Symposium

Indexical Design Symposium

Sat, Jun 25, 2016 All day event 77 St. Stephens St. Boston, Fenway Center, MA 02115 Free and Open to the Public
Conversation, Lecture, Panel Discussion, Presentation, Symposium Sat, Jun 25, 2016
All day event 77 St. Stephens St. Boston, Fenway Center, MA 02115 Free and Open to the Public

Information visualization is concerned with the symbolic languages of charts, maps, and diagrams. Its underlying data are also symbolic representations: the results of processes encoding traces and events. At the same time, traces such as tree rings, fingerprints, or ice core samples are also visualizations that we can directly experience.

The symposium explores the physical trace and its role for making sense of the world. We will investigate the different scientific, aesthetic, and rhetoric techniques for making traces “speak.” In Charles Sanders Peirce’s semiology, indexicality refers to the causal connection between an object and its effects in the real world: dyed bacterial cultures in a petri dish, the chemical signatures of pollutants in the environment, the wear on the pages of a book. Indexicality connects the abstract domain of information with bodily experience.

Like data, traces are often assumed as being “given,” but again, like data, they are constructed through measurement. How we perceive traces is a result of how we frame them. The symposium proposes “Indexical Design” as a new paradigm for data visualization that is specifically relevant for fields that deal with traces, markers, and indices; fields such as microbiology, forensics, or citizen science. Indexical design addresses the difference between data and evidence. We will bring together experts from these and other fields to investigate the physical manifestations of information and discuss the role of design in framing how these traces speak to us.

Presented by Northeastern’s MFA Information Design and Visualization. In partnership with Swissnex & Goethe Institut.

Please register at Eventbrite Here.

Presenters: 
Simon A. Cole
Catherine D’ignacio
Florian Dombois
Paul Dourish
Kristian Kloeckl
Jens Hauser
Inge Hinterwäldler
Susanne Jaschko
Ivan Rupnik
Moritz Stefanen
Tom Schofel
Orkan Telhan
Dietmar Offenhuber
Sara Wylie

For More Information and Registration
SCHEDULE:

PRE-CONFERENCE DATA CUISINE WORKSHOP:
A participatory workshop lead by Susanne Jaschko and Moritz Stefaner
June 23-24, 2015
If interested please register HERE

SYMPOSIUM:
June 25th 2016
Location: Northeastern University, Fenway Center
77 St. Stephens St

9:30 am
Introduction

9:30 am
Panel I: Appearance – the Aesthetics of Indexicality
How are traces produced and what differentiates a trace from a diagram?
Florian Dombois
Inge Hinterwäldler
Susanne Jaschko & Moritz Stefaner
Tom Schofield

11:30 am
Fast Panel & Lunch Break

2:00 pm
Panel II: Consequence – Evidence, Forensics & Citizen Science
When does a trace count as evidence?
Jens Hauser
Catherine D’ignazio
Ivan Rupnik
Simon A. Cole

4:00 pm
Panel III: Embodiment of Meaning Across Scales
Practices of encoding traces across scales – what gets lost, transformed, preserved?
Orkan Telhan
Paul Dourish
Kristian Kloeckl

Presenters

Click on photos for full bios.

Location

77 St. Stephens St. Boston

Fenway Center

77 St. Stephens St.
Boston, MA 02115

MA 02115

Simon A. Cole

Simon A. Cole is Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and Director of the Newkirk Center for Science & Society at the University of California, Irvine. He received his Ph.D. in Science & Technology Studies from Cornell University. Dr. Cole is the author of Suspect Identities: A History of Fingerprinting and Criminal Identification (Harvard University Press, 2001), which was awarded the 2003 Rachel Carson Prize by the Society for Social Studies of Science, and Truth Machine: The Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting (University of Chicago Press, 2008, with Michael Lynch, Ruth McNally & Kathleen Jordan). He is a member of the Human Factors Subcommittee of the National Commission on Forensic Science and the Forensic Culture Task Force for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and a Co-Investigator in the NIST Center for Excellence, the Center for Statistics and Applications in Forensic Evidence. He is Co-Editor of the journal Theoretical Criminology.

Jens Hauser

Jens Hauser is a Copenhagen and Paris based media studies scholar and art curator focusing on the interactions between art and technology. He holds a dual research position at both the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies and at the Medical Museion at the University of Copenhagen, and is a distinguished affiliated faculty member of the Department of Art, Art History and Design at Michigan State University. His curated exhibitions include L’Art Biotech (Nantes, 2003), StillLiving (Perth, 2007), sk-interfaces (Liverpool, 2008/Luxembourg, 2009), the Article Biennale (Stavanger, 2008), Transbiotics (Riga 2010), Fingerprints… (Berlin, 2011/Munich/2012) Synth-ethic (Vienna, 2011), assemble | standard | minimal (Berlin, 2015), SO3 (Belfort, 2015) and Wetware (Los Angeles, 2016). Hauser is also a founding collaborator of the European culture channel ARTE and has produced numerous reportages and radio features.

Moritz Stefaner

Moritz Stefaner works as a “truth and beauty operator” on the crossroads of data visualization, information aesthetics and user interface design. With a background in Cognitive Science (B.Sc. with distinction, University of Osnabrueck) and Interface Design (M.A., University of Applied Sciences Potsdam), his award-winning work beautifully balances analytical and aesthetic aspects in mapping abstract and complex phenomena. His work has been exhibited at Venice Biennale of Architecture, SIGGRAPH, Ars Electronica and the Max Planck Science Gallery. Find his personal portfolio at http://truth-and-beauty.net. He also publishes the Data Stories podcast (http://datastori.es) together with Enrico Bertini.

Susanne Jaschko

Dr Susanne Jaschko is a Berlin based independent curator, author and lecturer. Her work centers on an experimental art practice expanding the understanding of art and its social and cultural effects. Digital culture is often a conceptual point of departure for her projects, since it deeply changed the understanding of authorship, the public, process, time and space. Former positions included Head of Presentations and of the Artist in Residence program at the Netherlands Media Art Institute in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and curator and deputy director of transmediale – festival of art and digital culture in Berlin, Germany. Under the label of ‘prozessagenten,’ she develops realises participatory and processual projects in collaboration with artists and designers – such as Data Cuisine. Next to her curatorial work she has taught on an academic level in Germany and abroad. Currently, she teaches at the Berlin University of the Arts and curates Colomboscope 2016, which will focus on art and digital cultures in Europe and South Asia. http://sujaschko.dehttp://prozessagenten.org

Tom Schofield

Tom Schofield is an artist, designer, educator and researcher based at Culture Lab, Newcastle University, UK. His practice-based research spreads across creative computational and electronic media, archives and collections interface design / visualisation and physical computing. His PhD thesis explored the role of technological materiality in developing works of art and design as part of ecologies of experience. Recent creative projects include Me_asure (with John Bowers) an interactive installation which combines the 19th C pseudo-science of physiognomy with contemporary face tracking technology, Neurotic Armageddon Indicator, a wall clock for the end of the world and null by morse, an installation with vintage military equipment and iPhones.

Dietmar Offenhuber

offenhuber.net

Dietmar Offenhuber is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University in the departments of Art + Design and Public Policy. He holds a PhD in Urban Planning from MIT, a MS in Media Arts and Sciences from the MIT Media Lab, and a Dipl. Ing. in Architecture from the Technical University Vienna. Dietmar was Key Researcher at the Austrian Ludwig Boltzmann Institute and the Ars Electronica Futurelab and professor in the Interface Culture program of the Art University Linz, Austria.

His research focuses on the role of new technologies and representation in urban governance and civic discourse. Dietmar led a number of research projects investigating formal and informal waste systems and has published books on the subjects of Urban Data, Accountability Technologies and Urban Informatics. His PhD dissertation received the Outstanding Dissertation Award 2014 from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT, his research received the Best Paper Award 2012 from the Journal of the American Planning Association.

In his artistic practice, Dietmar frequently collaborates with the sound artist Markus Decker and composers Sam Auinger and Hannes Strobl under the name “stadtmusik.” His artistic work has been exhibited internationally in venues including the Centre Pompidou, Sundance and the Hong Kong International Film Festival, ZKM Karlsruhe, Secession Vienna, the Seoul International Media Art Biennale. His awards include the first price in the NSF Visualization Challenge, the Jury Award at the Melbourne International Animation Festival, the Art Directors Club Silver Award, a Special Mention at the 12th International Media Art Biennale WRO07 and Honorary Mentions from File Festival, Ars Electronica and Transmediale, Berlin.

Ivan Rupnik

Ivan Rupnik holds a BArch from Louisiana State University and Master of Architecture with distinction from Harvard GSD.  From 2005 until 2007, Ivan was the Principal Instructor of the Architectural Program of Harvard GSD’s Career Discovery program, and from 2005 to 2006 he was an Assistant Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Architecture.

Ivan is the coauthor of Project Zagreb: Transition as Condition, Strategy, Practice (Actar, 2007), the author of A Peripheral Moment: Experiments in Architectural Agency (Actar, 2010), and is also editing “Home Work: Contemporary Housing Delivery Systems” (2011). Since 2007, Ivan has served as an urban design and planning consultant to the University of Zagreb’s Spatial Planning and Development Office.

– See more at: https://camd.northeastern.edu/architecture/people/ivan-rupnik/#sthash.De1dUfuJ.dpuf

Sara Wylie

Co-founder of Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute, Northeastern University

Sara Wylie seeks to develop new modes of studying and intervening in large-scale social issues such endocrine disrupting chemicals through a fusion of social scientific, scientific and art/design practices. Dr. Wylie is Director of Toxics and Health Research for Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science, and has a joint appointment between Health Sciences and the Sociology/Anthropology program as part of Northeastern’s new Institute of Social Science and Environmental Health Research. She completed her Ph.D. in MIT’s History, Anthropology, Science, Technology and Society (HASTS) Program in 2011. Her dissertation, entitled “Corporate Bodies and Chemical Bonds: an STS analysis of the American Natural Gas Industry”, involved ethnographic study with The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, a non-profit founded by Theo Colborn, lead author of Our Stolen Future, whose independent research on chemicals used in natural gas extraction influenced national discussions of hydraulic fracturing. Ethnographic study with this organization and communities experiencing natural gas extraction lead to her develop web-based tools to help communities and experts across the country study and hold extractive industries accountable for their social and environmental impacts. This project called ExtrAct was developed in collaboration with artist and technologist Chris Csikszentmihalyi, in MIT’s Center for Civic Media. Following her interest in digital media, Wylie taught classes on practicing social science critique of science and technology through art and design and co-lead a research group with Jeff Warren on Environmental Justice in Rhode Island School of Design’s (RISD), Digital+Media Department. In 2011 Wylie co-founded a non-profit dedicated to developing open source, Do-It-Yourself tools for community based environmental health research, Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (PLOTS-publiclaboratory.org). PLOTS won a Knight Foundation’s News Challenge Grant in the summer of 2011. Read about Sara’s latest endeavor here. 

Kristian Kloeckl

Kristian Kloeckl is Associate Professor at Northeastern University in the Department of Art + Design and the School of Architecture. He holds a PhD in Product and Communication Design, and a Master degree in Industrial Design.

Prior to coming to Northeastern, Kristian was a research scientist and the Real Time City Group Lead at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Senseable City Lab as part of which he established the lab’s research unit in Singapore. There, he and his team pioneered a data platform and data visualization research initiative that brought together real time data from many of Singapore’s key urban systems operators (telecommunication, transportation, energy, environment) and developed technologies for the analysis, dynamic visual representation and interaction with this data. Kristian was a faculty member at the University IUAV of Venice’ Department of Design and Planning in Complex Environments (former Faculty of Design and Arts), teaching in the Master in Industrial Design and directing two research units. He has worked as a professional designer with studios in Berlin, Milan and Venice as well as out of his own consultancy with companies in Austria and Italy.

His work is guided by an interest in exploring meaningful ways to disclose the potential of technological innovations by developing novel application scenarios and solutions as well as interface and interaction modalities to form valuable connections between people, objects, space, and the digital data layers that increasingly pervade our environment.

Kristian has published in international journals and books and his work has been exhibited at venues such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Vienna MAK, the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Singapore Art Museum, as well as the China Millennium Monument Museum of Digital Arts. Kristian is a frequent speaker at international conferences and has amongst others presented at World Bank SDN Forum, Red Dot Design Museum Singapore, Austrian Innovation Forum in Vienna, Platform Strategy Executive Symposium at MIT Media Lab, ICA Conference in Taipei, and eGov Global Exchange in Singapore.