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Alumna Natasha Taylor Embraces Creativity to Have an Impact While Having Fun – and Empowers Other Entrepreneurs to Do the Same

Photo Courtesy of Natasha Taylor.

Northeastern alumna Natasha Taylor is a designer, creator, and marketer who co-leads a small business, has worked in full-time graphic design roles across various industries, and stays involved in volunteer work – all while supporting and mentoring other women entrepreneurs along the way. She graduated with a double major in Graphic Design and Marketing (as well as her master’s in Digital Media), and went on to co-found her own company, We’re Into It, which specializes in hand lettering and design for special events, branding, and décor. Along with this “side hustle” – which started as an Etsy shop and has evolved into much more – Natasha has continued to work in the graphic design and marketing fields, first at Northeastern University and now at LogMeIn. She is passionate about what she does, and strives to use design as a tool to solve problems, tell compelling stories, and have a positive impact.

Natasha launched We’re Into It in 2015 with fellow Northeastern alumna Amelia Rossi as a way to create, share, and sell items inspired by what they are into – and to design items that bring value and smiles to their owners.

Photo Courtesy of Natasha Taylor.

It all began with their Etsy shop, which sells greeting cards, prints, buntings, totes (and more) to buyers around the world. Now, the wedding side of the business has also become a major component. Natasha and Amelia design completely custom stationery for a couple’s big day – including everything from the save the date to the thank you notes.

“Being able to connect with our clients and help bring their visions to life is one of my favorite parts of the business,” Natasha explained. “I have a love for paper and stationery, and the printed pieces we make can be kept and cherished forever; they help make an event extra special.”

In addition to the wedding arm of the business, We’re Into It also hosts hand-lettering workshops for the Boston community, which Natasha and Amelia are currently re-envisioning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. These workshops have been held at Albertine Press in Cambridge as well as restaurants in the area; they attract all different people who share a love of hand-lettering.

Photo Courtesy of Natasha Taylor.

“It’s so rewarding to see the guests’ skills improve in just a few hours, and they can continue to utilize us a resource even after the event,” said Natasha. “Most aspects of the business are rewarding and so exciting, but we also constantly challenge ourselves to put our business hats on and dive into the sourcing, development, and financial side of things. Amelia and I are both creatives so while we’d love to focus all our time on creating the products, we have also worked hard to figure out the business logistics.”

As business owners, they wear many hats, but regardless of how much they are juggling, Natasha has always prioritized making sure the side hustle is still fun.

“If running a side hustle gets to the point where you really don’t enjoy it, it may be time to explore what needs to change,” she said. “For me, it’s been great having a business partner; we seamlessly split the work or cover for each other when we need to, which alleviates some of the stress of running your business, especially while also working full-time.”

Natasha’s full-time gig is at LogMeIn, where she is a Graphic Designer focusing on the events and campaigns that support the corporate brand. In this role, she gets to work on a variety of different products, in a forward-thinking company, surrounded by a group of talented and creative people. While it takes a lot to strike a balance between a full-time gig and a side hustle, Natasha credits time management and flexibility as two keys to success.

I am a professional multitasker…

“…but I do also take clean breaks between the two. This allows me to stay more focused and be sure not to carry over the emotions from one into the other,” Natasha explained.

Before she joined LogMeIn, she was a staff member at Northeastern, working in the Development Office as a Graphic Design and Marketing Coordinator and then an Assistant Director of Design and Marketing. In these roles, she had the opportunity to focus on the Women Who Empower Summit, as well as the branding of the initiative more broadly.

“The annual Summit will always hold a special place in my heart,” Natasha said. “I remember the year it launched, it was the day after the 2016 election and emotions were high, but minute-by-minute, the incredible women and leaders in that room brought us all together. It was a magical day in the end and the perfect way to kick off future Women Who Empower events.”

As an alumna working at Northeastern, Natasha was able to apply some of the insights from her time as a student to her role and the campaigns she worked on.

At Northeastern, we all have this entrepreneurial side to us, no matter what you are studying…

“Students are interested in co-op, interested in careers, and they are innovative. I was able to carry that into my work right away,” she said.

And while Natasha no longer works at the University, she will always be a proud alumna and looks forward to continuing to stay involved. She is a member of Northeastern’s Women Who Empower Ambassadors Program, a select group of student and alumni leaders – representing diverse backgrounds and global communities – who share a commitment to advancing the Women Who Empower mission. She is also joining the Women’s Interdisciplinary Society of Entrepreneurship (WISE) WeSupport mentorship program, where she will work directly with a Northeastern undergraduate student. These volunteer positions will allow her to continue to connect with, empower, and elevate other entrepreneurs, especially young women – and pass down the lessons she has learned so far.

“Embracing as many networking opportunities as possible and connecting with other women business owners and entrepreneurs is something I learned and want to encourage others to do, as well. These folks do not have to be in the same industry as you, the lessons are still transferrable,” Natasha concluded. “Use each other as sounding boards, promote each other’s businesses, and grow your network – that will be invaluable.”