Spring 2018 Courses

THTR 1101. Introduction to Theatre. 4 Hours.

Reveals the dynamic world of theatre by exploring the artistry, ideas, and techniques of actors, designers, directors, and playwrights. Goes behind the scenes in the study of theory and literature with both in-depth discussions and in-class performances. Includes a survey of significant movements in theatre history and analysis of diverse plays from contemporary drama. No theatre experience required.
Taught by Jonathan Carr
10:30-11:35 MWR

 

THTR 1125. Improvisation. 4 Hours.

Introduces theatre improvisation principles through games, exercises, and readings. Offers a playful and rigorous environment for students to respond to unexpected situations with confidence and agility. In this experiential studio course, students participate in group and individual exercises that explore and practice creative impulses, adaptability, risk taking, intuition, and teamwork. Culminates in a self-reflection paper.
Taught by Antonio Ocampo-Guzman
9:50-11:30 TF

 

THTR 1130. Introduction to Acting. 4 Hours.

Introduces techniques that awaken the creative mind, body, and spirit of the actor. Through theatre games and voice/movement exercises, offers students an opportunity to explore and develop skills used by actors in preparation for a role. Students rehearse and perform scenes from contemporary plays. Designed for non-theatre majors; previous stage experience welcome but not required.
Taught by Jonathan Carr, Jesse Hinson and Samantha Richert
9:50-11:30 TF
11:45-1:25 MR
2:50-4:30 MW

 

THTR 1131. Technical Theatre 1. 4 Hours.

Surveys the technical and stagecraft skills that are essential knowledge for all theatre professionals. Offers students an opportunity to develop a hands-on understanding of the areas of scenery and costume construction, production management, stage management, sound engineering, and lighting. Covers the practical skills needed to participate in the creation, evaluation, and revision of a theatrical production in this laboratory-based course through participation in crew work for department productions. No previous theatre experience is required.
Taught by Janet Bobcean
1:35-3:15 TF

 

THTR 1160. The Professional Voice. 4 Hours.

Offers students across disciplines an opportunity to obtain techniques to enhance the quality of the spoken voice and improve clarity of expression in both professional and interpersonal interactions. Offers methods to release tensions that inhibit the clear communication of thoughts and ideas. Focuses on physical and vocal exercises drawn from acting technique and the direct application of these skills to various texts. Includes regular vocal exercises outside of class, readings, and self-reflection in writing. Requires proficiency in spoken English.
Taught by Jesse Hinson
1:35-3:15 TF

 

THTR 1230. The Evolution of Fashion and Costume. 4 Hours.

Traces the evolution of fashion and costume from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. Illustrated lectures focus on the history and meaning of clothing design and the development of style. Clothing has been used for centuries to protect, attract, and define one’s identity. Examines the shifting trends of fashion for men and women within its historical, cultural, and economic contexts.
Taught by Frances McSherry
11:45-1:25 WF

 

THTR 1260. Movement for the Actor. 4 Hours.

Explores movement techniques that enhance the actor’s expressiveness, performance energy, and body awareness. Offers students an opportunity to experience diverse movement training theories such as Suzuki, Alexander, and Laban and synthesize them in the creation of an original ensemble-based performance. Focuses on physical exercises and processes that strengthen the body; enliven the imagination; enhance concentration; and improve flexibility, balance, relaxation, and posture. No previous movement or acting experience required.
Taught by Jesse Hinson
11:45-1:25 WF

 

THTR 1270. Introduction to Theatrical Design. 4 Hours.

Introduces the principles of contemporary theatrical design and how to apply the creative process to scenery, costumes, and lighting. Offers students an opportunity to discover how design concepts are developed and relate to each other through research, script analysis, color theory, and visual composition. Seeks to develop the student’s capacity for collaboration and techniques for conceptualizing a play into a multidisciplinary work of art. No theatre experience required.
Taught by Frances McSherry
3:35-5:05 TF

 

THTR 2242. Fashion Retailing. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the different types and sizes of fashion retail operations; physical site location, including omni-channel; store layout and design; advertising and display; relation of the store to its intended target market; and store organization.
Taught by Meg Stone
Online

 

THTR 2300. Classics of Global Theatre. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to discover the rich history of the theatre from Greek tragedies to Shakespeare’s celebrated masterpieces, from Japanese Noh theatre to the witty Restoration comedies of the 1800s. Explores notable plays from Medieval and Elizabethan England, the golden age of Spain, 17th-century France, and the Italian Renaissance. Includes contextual study of the evolution of theatre and the artistic contributions to Western civilization by writers such as Sophocles, Marlowe, Calderón, and Molière.
Taught by Dani Snyder-Young
10:30-11:35 MWR

 

THTR 2310. History of Musical Theatre. 4 Hours.

Traces the creative evolution of the stage musical from its 19th-century origins to current Broadway hits; from popular entertainment to an important theatrical art. Offers students an opportunity to examine this unique and original art form from multiple perspectives—historical, cultural, political, and aesthetic—and to develop insights into the concepts and methods of such pioneering composers, lyricists, and theatre artists as Gilbert and Sullivan, Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Leonard Bernstein, and Stephen Sondheim.
Taught by Chris Caggiano
2:50-4:30 MW

 

THTR 2330. Playwriting. 4 Hours.

Offers a collaborative workshop environment for developing dialogue, scenes, and one-act plays. Analyzes the dramatic techniques of modern masters as well as acclaimed contemporary playwrights. Culminates in the development of original one-act plays and a presentation of workshop scripts by professional actors.
Taught by Nina Louise Morrison
9:50-11:30 TF

 

THTR 2335. Boston Theatre Experience. 4 Hours.

Offers a comprehensive experiential survey of professional theatre today. Students attend Boston-area productions that reflect a diverse range of styles and aesthetics, with special emphasis on the creation of new plays. Through preparatory readings and lectures, combined with postplay critical assessments (oral and in writing) and interactions with theatre artists (playwrights, actors, directors), offers students an opportunity to examine and discover how to interpret the art of contemporary theatre in the United States, from fringe companies to Broadway, as audience members and aspiring artists. Requires attendance at plays outside of class time.
Taught by Bridget O’Leary
1:35-3:15 TF

 

THTR 2345. Acting for the Camera. 4 Hours.

Explores the craft and methods used by actors while working in front of the camera through monologues, scenes, and group projects. Provides students with techniques to identify and free their performance energy with a foundation on relaxation and authenticity. Includes the study and analysis of acting styles in diverse genres of film and television from situation comedies to dramas. Offers students an opportunity to explore a range of on-camera skills and acting techniques and apply them in filmed final projects. Previous acting experience suggested but not required.
Taught by Dennis Starosefsky
11:45-1:25 MR

 

THTR 2370. Lighting Design. 4 Hours.

Examines basic principles and practices of stage lighting, including the qualities and functions of light, lighting instruments and controls, use of color and directionality, and script analysis for lighting design elements. Offers students an opportunity to develop foundational skills and practice systematic reasoning in the programming and operation of lighting computer equipment. Through group projects and individual lab work, students create and execute lighting designs. Includes work on electrics crews for university productions.
Taught by Oliver Wason
2:50-4:30 MW
3:25-5:05 TF

 

THTR 2380. Costume Design. 4 Hours.

Introduces the fundamentals of costume design and the artistic roles and responsibilities of a costume designer. Working with classical and contemporary texts, students examine the creative steps of the design process, including script analysis, character development, research, and collaboration. Through lectures, discussions, and projects, students create a design concept and communicate it through language and images. Includes experience with drawing and other costume rendering techniques such as painting, collage, and Photoshop. Does not require prior art or design experience.
Taught by Frances McSherry
9:50-11:30 TF

 

THTR 2385. Fashion Construction and Pattern Making. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills and techniques necessary for creating and using basic master patterns and dress forms to create skirts, dresses, trousers, and tops. Covers basic fashion construction, flat patterning, draping, and finishing techniques.
Taught by Margaret Koerber
3:25-5:05 TF