A Place for Not Forgetting

The spaces and places of past generations mark the worlds we live in and how we see them. Entangled relations of race, gender, and capitalism as well as residual forms of coloniality challenge renderings of space and history often presented as static and singular.

In A Place for Not Forgetting, Alex Callender uses drawing, painting, and installation to trace colonial legacies buried in our contemporary imagination. Callender mines archival material from around the Black Atlantic, a term used to describe the cultural exchange and experience of the African diaspora in the Caribbean, the United States, and Western Europe, to explore the broader social, economic, and political structures in and through which Black life, identity, and space have been—and continue to be—shaped.

Recently, Callender has focused her practice on the history of housing (in)justice in the urban northeast, considering the ways that archival recovery can foster a better understanding of today’s social inequities. In making visible previously overlooked stories, Callender’s overlapping depictions of geography-history and space-time prompt us to think about the ways in which we orient ourselves to the past.

Header Image: Alex Callender, History Constructs the House that Sometimes Holds Us (detail), 2020. Courtesy of the artist.